Using a Role-play Video to Convey Expectations About Academic Integrity

ABSTRACT

We have developed an instructional video that uses role-play to illustrate the differences between acceptable behavior and cheating on assignments. Since we began showing it in an introductory chemical engineering course, the average number of confirmed instances of cheating decreased slightly, but the average percentage of students who were caught cheating and appealed our accusation to the campus Judicial Board dropped from 24% pre-video to 1% post-video. We conclude that the video makes students aware of what constitutes cheating in our course, may reduce the incidence of cheating, and increases the likelihood that students who are caught cheating will admit their fault and accept the penalty.
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Correction to Table 1: Updated March 2018

 

Lisa G. Bullard Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC

Lisa G. Bullard
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC

Adam T. Melvin Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC

Adam T. Melvin
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC

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