An Evaluation of HigherEd 2.0 Technologies in Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Courses

ABSTRACT

Between 2006 and 2010, sophomore engineering students at four universities were exposed to technologies designed to increase their learning in undergraduate engineering courses. Our findings suggest that students at all sites found the technologies integrated into their courses useful to their learning. Video solutions received the most positive feedback and were found to be the most beneficial to the students. When used as intended, the course blog provides a discussion tool for the students allowing for asynchronous collaboration. The inclusion of technology in engineering courses has the potential to positively impact student learning and collaboration. Students find the availability of video solutions very helpful to their learning, and when the course blog is used by enough students, it provides an easy way for students to receive assistance from their peers and instructors.

 

Full Text (PDF)

Amy Orange University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA

Amy Orange
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA

Charles Krousgrill Purdue University West Lafayette, IN

Charles Krousgrill
Purdue University
West Lafayette, IN

Walter Heinecke University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA

Walter Heinecke
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA

Borjana Mikic Smith College Northampton, MA

Borjana Mikic
Smith College
Northampton, MA

Edward Berger University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA

Edward Berger
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA

Dane Quinn University of Akron Akron, OH

Dane Quinn
University of Akron
Akron, OH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry, no comments or trackbacks are allowed on this post.